Category Archives: Application

Cardboard paperboard can’t always be recycled

Baling presses for waste cardboard recyclingRecycling cardboard should be easy, and some 77% of cardboard is recycled, according to the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), not all cardboard can be recycled.

There are two kinds of cardboard.

Corrugated cardboard — used to make brown packing boxes — is identified by the wavy inner layer of cardboard, making it a kind of three-layer sandwich of cardboard. Continue reading

What Is PET?

What is PET | Baling presses for waste PET recyclingPolyethylene terephthalate or as it is more commonly known PET or PETE is a polymer resin that is part of the polyester family. It has a wide range of uses including synthetic fibers, food, beverage and other liquid containers.

PET is simply referred to as polyester when it is used in textile applications. The name PET or PETE is used mainly in packaging applications. Some of these are used in bottles for soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, edible oils, pharmaceuticals, and detergents. PET is one of the most common plastics being used by consumers. Continue reading

Steps to Wire A Cardboard Bale From The Baling Press

Steps to Wire a Cardboard Baling Press No matter what type of cardboard baling press, emptying it requires following a few simple instructions.

First, pull down the front wire gate and press the “On” button located on the right side of the baling press to compress the cardboard. Wait until the baling press has compressed the cardboard all the way and then press the red “Stop” button to hold it in place. Turn the knob on the right side counter-clockwise to open the baler and expose the cardboard.

Then, pull open the door all the way and check whether the cardboard is compressed in place. Grab four pieces of 1/8-inch thick wire long enough to wrap around the cardboard. This wire usually need to be at least 12 feet long and will be wrapped around the cardboard so it does not break open when the pressure is released. Slide the first piece of wire through the first hole between the top of the cardboard and the baling press, beginning at either end. Move to the other side of the baler and slide the same piece of wire through the bottom.

Grip the top and bottom of the wire. Tighten it down around the cardboard. Wrap the wire in circles around itself along the front of the cardboard to secure a knot around the cardboard. Move down to the third hole and repeat the same process with the second piece of wire. Install the remaining two pieces of wire, skipping a hole between each so that the wires are spaced at equal lengths down the cardboard. Tighten the wires in place. Slide a pallet onto the ground directly in front of the baling press to make sure the cardboard can fall onto it.

Press the “On” button on the baler to begin raising it and release the pressure from the cardboard. Step back and wait for the cardboard to tip onto the pallet once the pressure is released. Shut the door once the cardboard is out. Turn the knob clockwise until the door is completely shut.

Steel Drum Baling Presses for Waste Drum Management

Although standard 55 gallon drums are one of the most convenient storage mediums seen in modern industrial facilities, the greatest limitation offered by the vessels is their comparatively large size that makes disposal difficult¸ When your business uses a lot of drums, you will soon discover that these useful storage items quickly become a liability when it comes to disposal¸ The relatively large size of the barrels coupled with the important and highly expensive costs of disposal under EPA guidelines means that one of the most important considerations facing any user of standard drums is their disposal¸ With this in mind, having appropriate systems such as steel drum compactors in place to reduce the disposal cost is vital to ensuring the continued profitability of your business¸ Proper disposal of steel drums, cubic yard boxes and containers of non-hazardous, special or hazardous waste can be a challenge for any industrial or manufacturing facility. Depending on the materials involved, disposal may require special handling as well as the completion of regulatory paperwork. Because the cost of handling and transporting drums can frequently surpass the costs of their actual disposal, Waste Management is committed to helping customers develop a collection and disposal plan that keeps these costs to a minimum.

Steel Drum Baling Presses for Waste Drum ManagementAs standard 55 gallon drums are one of the most convenient storage mediums seen in modern industrial facilities, but the greatest limitation offered by the vessels is the comparatively large size that makes disposal difficult¸

When your business uses a lot of drums, you will soon discover that these useful storage items quickly become a liability when it comes to disposal¸ Proper disposal of steel drums, cubic yard boxes and containers of non-hazardous, special or hazardous waste can be a challenge for any industrial or manufacturing facility.

The relatively large size of the barrels coupled with the important and highly expensive costs of disposal under EPA guidelines means that one of the most important considerations facing any user of standard drums is their disposal¸ Depending on the materials involved, disposal may require special handling as well as the completion of regulatory paperwork. Because the cost of handling and transporting drums can frequently surpass the costs of their actual disposal,

HASSWELL is committed to helping customers develop a collection and disposal plan that makes the waste drums diposal management costs to a minimum. With this in mind, having appropriate systems such as steel drum baling presses in place to reduce the disposal cost and help to ensure the continued profitability of your business¸

 

Hazardous Waste Drums Storage Requirements(B)

Hazardous Waste Drums Storage Requirements(二)Waste is collected at the point of generation. Each container used for satellite accumulation must be labeled as a hazardous waste. Each container must be under the control of the person working at the generating point. No more than a total of 55 gallons can be accumulated in the satellite accumulation area. If 55 gallons of hazardous waste is accumulated, the accumulation start date must be added to all accumulation containers or to the drum used to consolidate the waste generated at each satellite site. Continue reading

Hazardous Waste Drum Storage Requirements(A)

Hazardous Waste Drum Storage Requirements(一)The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has standards for the storage of hazardous waste drums. These standards are part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulating hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities. Proper hazardous waste drum storage is an important, integral part of the overall tracking system used by generators, treaters, storers, transporters and disposers of hazardous wastes. Continue reading